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Le liseur du 6h27 by Jean Paul Didierlaurent

Guylain Vignolles, a surname subject to much ridicule, has a most exciting life. Although… Every morning, he gets up at the same time, takes the 6:27 a.m. RER and walks through the doors of the factory that hires him. Every day, he has to put up with the stupidity of his colleague Brunner, the bad temper and the boring authority of his boss Kowalski and press the little green button that activates The Thing, the Zerstor 500, an immense machine that greedily swallows, grinds and rejects unsold books and discards. And every evening, it is impregnated with this horrible smell of paper that he returns home, feeds his goldfish, Rouget de Lisle. A short phone call to his mother every Thursday evening and life goes by like this… His only little daily happiness, he finds it in the pages that this shredder has not yet pounded. Before leaving his post, he takes with him a few pages that have escaped this Thing and reads them in the RER at 6:27. This solitary man, who only seeks to blend in with the crowd, knows other little moments of joy, namely the time he shares with Yvon, the factory gatekeeper, a fan of theater and poetry. , he never stops expressing himself in alexandrines, his former colleague, Giuseppe, whose leg the Thing ate and who found a funny way to recover it…


Climb aboard this 6:27 RER, lower the orange folding seat and let yourself be guided by the enchanting voice of Guylain, a man whose existence is altogether banal and who, despite his passion for books, crushes them. Jean-Paul Didierlaurent tells us about this slice of life, with ambient monotony and marked by a certain loneliness. Despite this, we follow this profoundly human and touching thirty year old man in his quest for a certain happiness. With a light, warm and poetic writing, this small concentration of good humor, improbable friendships, recited alexandrines, sometimes dyslexic old women and love for books plunges us into a kind of tranquility and takes us out, for a few minutes, of our monotony.


AUTHOR

Maud Jaquet

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